Category Archives: Capstone Downtown

Is Your New Year's Resolution Still Going Strong?

How is your New Year’s resolution coming along?  If you are like most people you are feeling the dragging, cold winter keeping you down.  Guess what?  Spring is right around the corner and the weather will change.  When it does, get out of the office and get that heart rate up.  Walk around downtown Columbus and see what’s going on.  The State House is celebrating its 150th anniversary and Columbus’ 199th anniversary this year, the Columbus Commons project is open at the former City Center Mall site, and there are new small businesses and restaurants opening around the square.  Capstone Dental might not be your idea of a must see destination downtown, but if you haven’t been to the dentist for a while, you’ll be surprised at all of the technologies and educational tools we provide.  So walk around, see what the city has to offer.  You can keep up on your resolution and maybe add another for great oral health in 2011.

Is Your New Year’s Resolution Still Going Strong?

How is your New Year’s resolution coming along?  If you are like most people you are feeling the dragging, cold winter keeping you down.  Guess what?  Spring is right around the corner and the weather will change.  When it does, get out of the office and get that heart rate up.  Walk around downtown Columbus and see what’s going on.  The State House is celebrating its 150th anniversary and Columbus’ 199th anniversary this year, the Columbus Commons project is open at the former City Center Mall site, and there are new small businesses and restaurants opening around the square.  Capstone Dental might not be your idea of a must see destination downtown, but if you haven’t been to the dentist for a while, you’ll be surprised at all of the technologies and educational tools we provide.  So walk around, see what the city has to offer.  You can keep up on your resolution and maybe add another for great oral health in 2011.

You Don’t Have to Have Bad Teeth

Did you know that don’t have to have bad teeth? This seems like a dumb question, but I run into people all the time who say, “My teeth are awful. My whole family has bad teeth. It’s genetics.” Of course there is a link between oral health and the genes you have inherited, but that isn’t the whole story. We inherit a lot from our parents, but we can still overcome genes to a certain extent. Just because you carry a gene for obesity, doesn’t mean you’ll be overweight. Just because your dad has high blood pressure and cholesterol doesn’t mean you will. It takes a little more effort to keep off those extra pounds and keep that BP in check, but it can be done. Just like you can have good teeth and gums even though you have relatives who have bad teeth. Put in the effort and you don’t have to have bad teeth.

You Don't Have to Have Bad Teeth

Did you know that don’t have to have bad teeth? This seems like a dumb question, but I run into people all the time who say, “My teeth are awful. My whole family has bad teeth. It’s genetics.” Of course there is a link between oral health and the genes you have inherited, but that isn’t the whole story. We inherit a lot from our parents, but we can still overcome genes to a certain extent. Just because you carry a gene for obesity, doesn’t mean you’ll be overweight. Just because your dad has high blood pressure and cholesterol doesn’t mean you will. It takes a little more effort to keep off those extra pounds and keep that BP in check, but it can be done. Just like you can have good teeth and gums even though you have relatives who have bad teeth. Put in the effort and you don’t have to have bad teeth.

February Newsletter from Capstone Dental

For good oral hygiene, follow these simple steps from the American Dental Hygienists’ Association:

1.    Brush. Brushing your teeth for two minutes at least twice a day remains a critical component to maintaining a healthy smile.  Studies have shown that brushing for two minutes is perhaps the single most important step an individual can take to reduce plaque build-up and the risk of plaque-associated diseases, such as cavities and gingivitis.

2.    Floss. Proper flossing removes plaque and food particles in places where a toothbrush cannot easily reach — under the gumline and between your teeth. Because plaque build-up can lead to tooth decay and gum disease, daily flossing is highly recommended.

3.    Rinse. Rinsing your mouth each day with an anti-microbial mouth rinse is another important step in preventing the gum disease known as gingivitis.  We can help provide you more information on which mouth rinse is right for you.

4.    Chew. Chewing sugar-free gum after eating is clinically proven to be an important part of good oral health. It stimulates the most important natural defense against tooth decay – saliva – which, in turn helps fight cavities, neutralize plaque acids, remineralize enamel to strengthen teeth and wash away food particles.

According to the American Dental Association, the mouth is a window into the health of the body. It can show signs of nutritional deficiencies, general infection or even indicate more serious illness. For example, systemic diseases, those that affect the entire body, such as diabetes, HIV, HPV, and heart disease, may first become apparent because of mouth lesions or other oral problems.

The mouth is filled with countless bacteria, some linked to tooth decay and periodontal (gum) disease. Researchers have found that periodontitis (the advanced form of periodontal disease that can cause tooth loss) is linked with other health problems, such as cardiovascular disease, stroke and bacterial pneumonia. Likewise, pregnant women with periodontitis may be at increased risk of delivering preterm and/or low-birth-weight infants.

It is important to your overall health to take good care of your teeth and gums. Regular check-ups along with semi-annual cleanings will help keep you healthy from head to toe. Call 614-223-1000 to schedule your check-up today.

Stop making excuses and get to the Dentist

Did you know that nearly half of the adult population in the United States doesn’t see a dentist regularly? Fear and anxiety are usually the reasons why. Fear of needles, drills, mean old dentists, etc. However, not going to the dentist is precisely why these fears continue. Dentistry has truly changed. New techniques and technologies not only make dentistry quicker and more convenient, but going to the dentist on a regular basis can prevent some of the more extensive work that terrifies people. Wouldn’t you rather have a cleaning and a few x-rays taken and minor problems solved before they become more extreme such as a root canal or even extraction? Prevention is the key. Brea has openings available. She doesn’t care if you haven’t been to the dentist in a while. She only cares that you are taking the necessary steps to take charge of your oral health now and for the rest of your life. This year treat yourself to a shining, healthy, pain-free smile. You’ll feel better, more confident, and people will notice.

Corner of Broad and High Looking Familiar

Did you know that a century ago, there was a dental practice at the same location as Capstone Dental?  Look closely between the sign that reads “Ticket Office” and the arch on the street.  Can you make out “Ohio Painless Dentists”?  Although we cannot advertise as “painless” these days, we do make going to the dentist as comfortable as possible.

Here is another picture of the same corner about three years later.  Behind the police officer, notice the “Columbus Painless Dentists” sign, the vertical “Dentist” sign, and the “Pulling of Teeth $3” sign.  Capstone Dental is now on the fourth floor of the Broad and High Building, just above this dentists’ office that served downtown Columbus 100 years ago.

Your Mouth In Numbers

The average person brushes his or her teeth for 30 seconds

  • The dentist recommends at least 2 minutes

Around 50% of adults do not visit the dentist regularly

  • Going to the dentist twice a year can prevent larger problems

Up to 80% of adults will develop Periodontal Disease

  • Perio, not decay is the main reason for tooth loss in US adults
  • Perio has been linked to heart disease, stroke, diabetes, premature and low birth-weight babies

You should replace your toothbrush every 3 months

  • Over time, your toothbrush wears and becomes very abrasive to your teeth
  • Germs love to grow in between your bristles.  Replace your toothbrush immediately after a cold or flu

45% of adults will suffer from bad breath at some point

  • There are many causes of bad breath.  Decaying teeth, periodontal disease, bacteria on your tongue and digestive problems are just a few

25% of adults over age 60 are missing all of their teeth

  • People are living longer, fuller lives.  Taking the necessary steps today can ensure that you are chewing comfortably with your natural teeth for the rest of your life